Translate

Saturday, January 5, 2019

My Cold War

MY COLD WAR

eBook (PDF), 300 Pages
MY COLD WAR
"On a day in the spring of 1956, my parents dressed my brother and me in brand new outfits, my mother put on makeup and her best, camel-hair coat, and we all went for a drive in the countryside near Montreal. We took along our puppy, Smokey, wrapped in a blanket in case he peed on the seats of our new car. Not long before, my father had agreed to enrol me in a special program, whose directors were very interested in bright little girls like me." So begins Ann Diamond's terrifying tale of growing up in Canada during the Cold War -- an era when secrecy ran rampant, ruining careers and lives. This is the true story of one family caught in a dangerous web of deception. Ann Diamond is an award-winning Canadian writer.

CUSTOMER REVIEWS:

1. 
Moriah reviewed My Cold War

My Cold War is a riveting read. August 20, 2017
My Cold War is a riveting read.  NAZI experiments were performed on children, to gather information on mind, brain and body control. Ann was included in these experiments, some of which lead to termination (children who did not survive the experiments). Eugenics “selective breeding and culling of the human race to favor the insiders and club members over the common herd (Diamond)” was their foundation. Ann asks, “What were they really trying to do?... Was the plan to create a future race of slaves? Is that why they performed lobotomies and drugged the children into a vegetable state? Were they trying to see how far they could go in destroying a soul in order to create a human robot, a functioning zombie who could be used as a disposable, unpaid labor force? Were they prepared to go that far?”
The answer is YES and they are achieving their goal.
     ... The entire planet is at stake.  Moriah Morningstar, author of A New Vision.Show Less
2. 
An Important Memoir July 3, 2017
Not many people know anything but the vaguest details about the MK Ultra experiments, and that orphans were locked up their entire childhoods, experimented on in unimaginable ways. Even stranger is that members of the army were blackmailed or intimidated into selling their children to the doctors at the same Montreal hospital for these experiments.
3. 

Sobering tale that answered questions about my life and filled gaps in my childhood memories August 21, 2015
I was led to this book via series of websites and I bought it after reading the first chapter-- Ann Diamond could have been writing about my father, my childhood, and my life. My father was also in intelligence in the 1960s and I spent a lot of time in military hospitals from 1963 to 1970, as I had Guillain Barre Syndrome paralysis....  Although my mother took a lot of photos, I am missing from many of them. Where was I? I am starting to put pieces together now and seeing glimpses of myself in a hospital bed, at night, with people around me --I couldn't move because I was paralyzed, and being in cold water (maybe that's why I have always hated being cold), and other strange memories of people, situations, and experiences, that have started cropping up in the past few years.

I was a perfect test candidate, highly intuitive, intelligent, curious, and from a 'perfect bloodline' on both sides of my parentage.... The sheer depravity of these experiments makes me sick and I hope that the courage of people like Ann Diamond, who come forward with their stories, will help bring understanding and peace to those, like me, who were part of these experiments, to bring these criminals to justice, and to stop these experiments, and all actions like them, forever.Show Less

VIEW MORE REVIEWS IN THE COMMENTS BELOW

5 comments:

Ann Diamond said...

MORE CUSTOMER REVIEWS

4.
Your Sister reviewed My Cold War
Drawing the line in the sand. February 14, 2014

You owe it to yourself and to humanity to read and thoroughly understand this important, courageous autobiography... and to comprehend the far reaching implications of the truths unflinchingly exposed by our good friend, Ann Diamond.

5.

E. Atkin reviewed My Cold War

Most Enlightening Book January 23, 2014

My mother was also a patient at the same hospital in Montreal under the MK ULTRA program. Thank you Ann Diamond for writing this book. It needed to be written. I hope that I can do as much research into my mother's case and unearth as much as you did in your book concerning how this tragedy of monumental scale can still be so hidden. We need to get this message out. I see Ann`s prescient book as the crack in the dam that will open the floodgates to releasing these records and offering restitution so families and individuals can heal. A world shattering book full of remarkable insights; A game changer.Show Less


6.

Reading in Montreal reviewed My Cold War

A chilling eye opener January 22, 2014

This account of growing up during a particularly alarming and secretive part of Montréal's history is extremely unnerving. The author's reflections of such a disturbing period are intense and thought provoking.

View on Amazon.com Add a comment View this book's reviews on Amazon.com

7.

Kitty Hundal reviewed My Cold War
Intriguing January 22, 2014

An intriguing look behind the historical curtain of Canada's inexplicable foray into the evils of mind control, psychological abuse and torture of children and adults. Emotionally difficult to read but the resulting insight is well worth the effort.


Ann Diamond said...

AND MORE CUSTOMER REVIEWS

8.

Amazon Customer reviewed My Cold War
My Cold War August 26, 2013

Very informative and eye opening book. The narrative is easy to follow although the events and inhumanity are challenging. This message needs to be delivered. Thank you


9.
Christina Manolescu:(Author of BAGLADY)

MY COLD WAR is extremely fluid and well written, honest, engaging and fascinating, not only because of its hair-raising subject matter but also the colourful and intimate descriptions of family life and the rich historic sweep of the narrative built up gradually in tiny brush-strokes on a wide canvas.

These descriptions and honest personal introspection from the vantage point of adulthood (interpreting the recollections of childhood-adolescence) give the other darker story its proper depth and context. They serve to heighten suspense and the poignancy of what is to come. The text reads beautifully (masterful, poetic and also humorous from time to time), with logical, detailed and carefully worded facts, insights and impressions that 'ring true' as the story gradually unfolds

MCW was a compelling read from start to finish...The finale was particularly strong, lyrical and emotional, finishing on a haunting note. Quite an achievement. Bravo!


10.
David Himmelstein (journalist, for New York Post etc.):

I finally got around to reading “My Cold War” and it has shaken me upward. You have really locked the macrocosm into the microcosm. The first thing that touched me early on was the tonal aspect your empathetic search for extenuating circumstances to explain parental betrayal. I think the ambivalence continues through the book and because of your openness it can come off as a loving both/and rather than either/or. I appreciate your openness and tentativeness about the writing of the book itself. The only thing I disagree with is your categorical dismissal of psychiatry, but if I’d been through what you have………..

The content speaks for itself. Manipulation is ubiquitous and the home is the front line of resistance or submission. You name the names (I assume legal considerations dictated the brainerdization of McGill) and chart the hard-wiring. I also admire your courage in putting forward a mention of the extra-terrestrial presence, even though you know that will be an instant credibility-breaker for many. But that element is going to find its place in the hurley-burley of the next few years.

I’m going to try and find time to write something about “My Cold War”. In the meantime, I can only express my humble awe at your courage and tenacity.

Good luck and God bless.

Dave

Ann Diamond said...

AND MORE REVIEWS:




11.
Dec. 29/10
Dear Ann,

I finished reading your book, My Cold War this morning.I was (still am) deeply moved by its content and I love your writing style.

It’s like water flowing in the desert, dissipating the drought and bringing hope by disclosure....

THANKS for that book....all your writings are fascinating and really helpful to me as a Canadian freedom fighter.



12.
Judy G. Janzen, Three Dead Words

The book, The Locker Room may lead you to think Ann Diamond is into the occult....based on the story of the channellers, spirit guides and a type of séance approach she described which was used to gain INTEL (which the CIA would label as remote viewing....) on the murdered children of the Montreal MKULTRA trauma-based/SRA-based mind control programming op in the 1950s/1960s.

I know where Ann is coming from and those occultists she went to.....to gain intel that had been buried with the MKULTRA murdered children....so her & their motive was pure.

It is a little amazing how accurate their more user-friendly remote viewing (spirit medium) intel gathering was.If you read Ann’s My Cold War, it all comes together.

She is so credible, so kind and so balanced at every level of her being.

Judy Janzen


13.
From Kelley:

Thanks so much for sharing your story and monumental talent in My Cold War… I have a million questions and comments about your book but for now let it suffice to share a couple of observations: your courageous efforts to get documents and ask questions of officialdom are super inspirational – your tenacity and hunger for the truth is evident throughout the book. I imagine that your insights have multiplied exponentially since then – would love to hear/read your afterword.

It’s excruciating to read about your sense of isolation and loneliness as a child. It’s such a universal theme among survivors of families touched by Masonic and government cognitive rape. Isolation on so many levels – personal and social. But in sharing your own history of isolation you’ve helped create a bridge for the rest of us – bridges of recognition, validation, empathy and identification. Such is the rich gift of art and of biographical disclosure.

Vagchandra said...

Thank you for sharing your e-book. Your blog has touched nerves many times over the years. Your personal story reminds me of some interesting points in common, like Scots-French heritage, a father with a security clearance in the Air Force , and especially, a psychiatrist grandfather who was a Mason, was a pioneer in the use of psychiatric drugs, practiced ECT and psychosurgery, was well-acquainted with Ewen Cameron, knew Walter Freeman personally and was a colleague and collaborator of Freeman's acolyte James Watts (Rosemary Kennedy's lobotomist). Watt's name used to come up in my grandparents' home when I was a kid. Moreover there were unexplained cuts, strange memories of being impaired by drugs and head injuries...Shortly after a mutual friend of ours introduced me to the work of Leonard Cohen, I found myself living a couple of blocks from his house, while working one block down from the Allan Memorial Institute, and uncomprehendingly reading Beautiful Losers at night. Around then it dawned on me that my life has been touched, or tainted, quite a bit by too-few-degrees of separation (to say the least) from the seamy underbelly of society you have researched so adamantly for so long.

Ann Diamond said...

I'm fascinated by your comment, Vagchandra. Can you tell me more especially about living downhill from the Allan? What year was that? If you like you can email me at anndiamond2011@gmail.com